Tenancy guide

Managing your tenancy

Tell us about a change to your household

If there has been a change to your household you can tell us online.

You can tell us if there have been changes to any of the following:

  • people moving in or out
  • the birth of a child
  • a name change

Report a change to the household

Tell us about a name change

Your tenancy agreement remains a valid document even if you have changed your name. Your name might change after a marriage, divorce or through deed poll.  

We do not issue a new tenancy agreement or alter the existing agreement.

If you want to update your name you can complete the form below. You will need to upload proof including:

  • a marriage certificate
  • a decree absolute
  • a deed poll document

Report a name change

Apply for a transfer

Council tenants can transfer from their current home to another within the borough.

Tenants can only transfer if they have a good reason including:

  • medical needs
  • having too many rooms in their current property
  • needing somewhere less expensive.

More information about transfers including eligibility can be found on the Locata website.

End your tenancy

If you wish to end your tenancy, you should contact the Housing Department using the form below.

When you request to end your tenancy, we will:

  • need four weeks’ written notice that you want to end your tenancy
  • charge you rent until the end of the notice period and the keys are returned
  • need the property to be returned clean and empty of people and belongings
  • serve a formal notice to end the tenancy if there is no one else who can do so.

Request to end a tenancy

Tell us about a death of a tenant

When a tenant dies, the tenancy does not end, even if no-one else lives in the property. We may ask a next-of-kin to end the tenancy or Resident Services may serve a notice to end the tenancy.

When you report the death of a tenant or occupant you may be asked for:

  • a copy of death certificate if you have it.

Report the death of a tenant

Moving to a nursing home or residential care

If someone you know is a council tenant and has moved to a residential or nursing home, you should let us know.

If the tenant is no longer able to deal with their affairs, we can accept four weeks’ written notice from a representative who has Power of Attorney. We will need to see proof of this.

When you request to end your tenancy, we will:

  • charge the tenant rent until the end of the notice period and the keys are returned
  • need the property to be returned clean and empty of people and belongings
  • serve a formal notice to end the tenancy if there is no one else who can do so.

Request to end a tenancy

Adding someone to your tenancy

You can ask to add someone else to your tenancy if:

  • you are married or in a civil partnership and your partner lives with you
  • your unmarried partner has lived with you for at least 12 months.

We will not create a joint tenancy between residents of different generations. An example of this includes a parent and child.

Your rent account must be clear or in credit. We will carry out identity and residency checks. Creating a joint tenancy is always at the discretion of Resident Services.

Discuss a sole to join tenancy change

Request a copy of your tenancy agreement

If you want a copy of your tenancy, we can send a copy to you. You will need to provide:

  • Your email or postal address.

Request a copy of your tenancy agreement

Taking over a tenancy (known as succession)

If the tenancy started before 1 April 2012 the following people can take over a tenancy:

  • Joint tenants – (they do not need to be living in the property)
  • Married or civil partners – living in the property at the time of death as their sole or main home
  • Family member or unmarried partners – having lived with the now deceased for more than 12 months before the date of death.

Successors who are family members or live-in carers may be required to move to alternative accommodation of suitable size.

If the tenancy started after 1 April 2012 the following people can take over a tenancy:

  • Joint tenants – (they do not need to be living in the property)
  • Married or civil partners – living in the property at the time of death as their sole or main home
  • Unmarried partners – living in the property at the time of death as their sole or main home
  • Family member – living with the deceased tenant for at least five years before the date of death. This is above what the law requires.
  • Live-in carer – living with the tenant for five years. Providing care for the deceased tenant for at least 12 months. Had given up accommodation to provide care. This is above what the law requires.
  • Successors who are family members or live-in carers may be required to move to alternative accommodation of suitable size.

Change from a joint tenancy to a sole tenancy

This is a complicated matter. You are advised to seek independent legal advice. The best way to end a joint tenancy is through a court order.  

A joint tenancy continues as long as one of the joint tenants is living in the property as their sole or main house.

Joint tenants are responsible for all the tenancy conditions. This includes rent arrears while the joint tenancy is a legal tenancy.

Different types of tenancy

You can find your tenancy type on your tenancy agreement.

  • Secure tenancy. A lifetime tenancy that continues until you give us four weeks’ written notice. Or we get a court order to end your tenancy.
  • Introductory tenancy. This means that you are on “probation" for 12 months.  As long as you keep to the tenancy conditions, your tenancy will change to a secure tenancy after 12 months. If you do not keep to the terms of your tenancy, we can apply to court for possession of your home.
  • Non-secure tenancy. You have been provided with temporary accommodation within a property owned by London Borough of Harrow.